Editorial Staff
3 months ago

Editorial Staff
3 months ago

Antigua and Barbuda Should Not Take Sides in the Venezuela-Guyana Dispute

You can now listen to Antigua News articles!

Antigua and Barbuda may want to refrain from taking sides in the conflict between Venezuela and Guyana as it may not be in the country’s best interest.

Today, Venezuelans are voting in a referendum to decide whether the country should establish its state within a large part of Guyana that is rich in oil.

Guyana has condemned this move as a step towards annexation and raised concerns about a possible military conflict between the two South American nations.

Being an unbiased mediator is the most beneficial approach since Twin Island has had friendly relations with Venezuela and Guyana.

Although Antigua and Barbuda is part of the Caricom position that calls on Venezuela to respect international law and to maintain hemispheric prace and solidarity, the country had not taken a national position

The Essequibo region, which amounts to about two-thirds of Guyana’s national territory and is the size of Florida, is at the center of the dispute.

Venezuela has argued that it was within its borders during the Spanish colonial period and has long claimed the land, while Guyana disputes this claim and refers to an 1899 ruling that set the current boundaries when Guyana was still a British colony.

The recent discovery of vast offshore oil fields in the area has increased the stakes of the dispute.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has portrayed the referendum as a manifestation of anti-imperialist sentiment and argued that Venezuela’s historical rights to the region have been unfairly disregarded.

Guyana has warned that the threat of annexation is “existential.”

The referendum poses several questions to voters, including whether they support creating a new state in the Essequibo region, giving its inhabitants Venezuelan citizenship, and “incorporating that state into the map of Venezuelan territory.”

2 Comments

  1. Steven C. Mayers

    Though I understood and appreciated President Hugo Chavez’s moves to Socialize his nation, so that the people of Venezuela would be the first to benefit from the natural resources of Venezuela, as the Colonial Powers continue to reap humongous profits from extricating and processing the natural resources, and though I support President Nicolas Maduro in his struggles in spite of the UNFAIR SANCTIONS that were levied on his countriy’s funds, forcing Venezuela’s MASS EXODUS and reduction to POVERTY, I cannot support Venezuela in its quest to annex any part of the Essequibo Basin because of its OIL.
    Whatever Guyana’s borders were when they gained independence from the British, should remain respected as their borders.
    If, as President Maduro claims, there have been prior disputes from before Guyana’s independence, then President Maduro’s argument is with the British Government, and should be taken to the International Courts, in which case, Guyana would be a co-defendant.

    Reply
    • Mae-Mary

      Venezuela President needs to leave well alone. If he has a problem where the border should be take it up with the British government. Venezuela Know if they decide to start any war, Guyana will get help from the American and British government’s military forces. President Hugo Chavez’s me beg you please leave Guyana alone and satisfy with what oil reserves you already have. Right now Antigua do not have room, incase Guyanese and Venezuelan decide to run for cover, when a war breaks out over oil!
      All me a beg the donkey bray Gaston, na go send ABDF soldiers into any war over oil and borders boundary line. He Gaston can go fight because he thinks that he is a bully and would win every fight.

      Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.